Let's face it, as a recruiter or staffing pro who lives on the phone you don't really care about the cloud, or 3G or 4G or any other tech specs and details. You just want to open up a browser in the palm of your hand and access a 700 GB database, whether you're sitting in your office, or in your car. Well, how would you like to be able to do that 1,000 times faster than you can today? And oh by the way, cell edges, handoffs, dead zones and dropped calls would also be a thing of the past. Yeah, I thought you might be interested.

So that's the good news. There is a San Francisco-based tech company called Artemis Networks that has unveiled what they call pCell™ technology, a new approach to wireless that  delivers full-speed mobile data to every mobile device, regardless of how many users are sharing the same spectrum at once.

The company says their technology will make cell towers a thing of the past, eliminating the congestion, and unreliable connections associated with with conventional cellular technology in the process.

Steve Perlman, the founder and CEO of Artemis, says mobile data demand has skyrocketed, almost doubling in the last year. It's projected to grow more than 25 times by the year 2020, "far outpacing the physics limits of conventional cellular technology," as the world’s mobile spectrum is exhausted.

"pCell delivers on the long-sought dream of ubiquitous, fast Internet, with the reliability and consistency previously only achievable through a wired connection; pCell is effectively mobile fiber.”

“pCell technology is a complete reinvention of wireless,” said Perlman, in a company press release. “pCell delivers on the long-sought dream of ubiquitous, fast Internet, with the reliability and consistency previously only achievable through a wired connection. pCell is effectively mobile fiber.”

I know I said you didn't care, but here's a brief explanation of current cellular technology.

With existing cellular networks, each tower transmits a radio signal, forming a large cell that avoids interfering with other cells. Mobile devices all take turns sharing the cell’s capacity.

This worked until nearly everyone on the planet started carrying smartphones and tablets, streaming videos and uploading photos. Taking turns among so many users, each demanding so much data, is slowing cell service to a crawl, despite the addition of more spectrum.

Arteis says instead of dodging interference, pCell exploits interference, combining transmitted radio signals from multiple pCell base stations to synthesize tiny “personal cells”—pCells—of wireless energy around each mobile device. So, rather than hundreds of users taking turns sharing the capacity of one large cell, each user gets an unshared pCell, giving the full wireless capacity to each user at once.

Rather than hundreds of users taking turns sharing the capacity of one large cell, each user gets an unshared pCell, giving the full wireless capacity to each user at once.

The company says pCell is compatible with standard, unmodified out-of-the box LTE devices, such as iPhone 5S and 5C, Samsung Galaxy S4, LTE dongles and MiFi devices. pCell enables a standard LTE device to run at full LTE speed throughout pCell coverage areas, and wherever pCell is not yet deployed, the device can hand off to conventional cellular, providing seamless coverage.pwaves-1

Again rather than cell towers, pCell uses pCell base stations, called pWave™ radios, that can be placed anywhere.

The technology - and the potential - certainly sounds cool. But don't start dreaming of downloading just yet.

The 10-person start-up is just now in trials with partners and won't be ready for first commercial deployment in a single market (probably San Francisco) until the end of the year. The company says it intends to expand to major markets in the US, Asia and Europe starting in 2015.

http://youtu.be/Z6NEnLvhFCk

Tags: Recruiters, News, Staffing pros, Cell phones, PCell, Artemis Networks, Steve Perlman