To all my friends who, like me, have gotten pissed off by the job hunt, at least one time, or another. Check out this Ask The Headhunter blog post on PBS and see if it rings true. For me, this is the line that says it all. "Here's the simple truth: Unemployment is made in America by employers who have given up control over their competitive edge -- recruiting and hiring -- to a handful of database jockeys who are funded by HR executives, who in turn have no idea how to recruit or hire themselves. Reading this, all I could say to myself was, this guy sees through the BS, and explains it for exactly what it is. And my question is when will this ever change? All the Best, Paul.

That was the email I received, verbatim, from a guy in one of my networking groups. I don't know anything abut his current situation, as in whether he is looking, unemployed, underemployed, etc., but his initial email did spark quite a discussion among our group. Let's take a look at the blog post and see if we can get a discussion going here on Staffing Talk.

You may have heard of Nick Corcodilos, who started headhunting in Silicon Valley in 1979, or read one of his 500 weekly Ask The Headhunter postings over the past decade.

It's this post the guy in my networking group was referring to, and quoting from. It's called "Unemployment -- made in America by employers."

Corcodilos opines that American employers aren't doing themselves or the economy any favors by spending on costly online job postings and waiting for the "perfect" candidate.

HR keeps talking about a talent shortage, but the only talent shortage is in the HR offices. 

Human resources executives run around in their corporate offices with their eyes closed, throwing billions of dollars at applicant tracking systems (ATSes) and job boards like Taleo, Monster.com and LinkedIn, and they pretend no one can see they are dancing in circles buck naked. HR keeps talking about a talent shortage, but the only talent shortage is in the HR offices. HR executives need to learn how to match up the 3.9 million vacancies with some of the 25 million under-employed.

Corcodilos admits the economy has some culpability, but says businesses, the media and the federal government continue to ignore the structural problems in our employment system.

Here is a laundry list of what he thinks the main problems are:

  1. Employers don't do their own hiring
  2. Employers don't know how to recruit
  3. The employment system vendors are lying
  4. Employers have no business plan
  5. America counts jobs, not profitable work
  6. People must stop begging for jobs

In summary, here is what Corcodilos says America must do to be truly competitive, in his words.

American employers must themselves do the hard work of identifying, attracting, recruiting, hiring and further training workers... outsourcing these critical tasks dulls a company's competitive edge.

American employers must themselves do the hard work of identifying, attracting, recruiting, hiring and further training workers who can ride a fast learning curve without falling off. Outsourcing these critical tasks dulls a company's competitive edge.

Business leaders, the media and the government must revisit their assumptions that automated employment systems are the answer and that the problem is with American workers. Until the structural problems with these systems are addressed, those 3.9 million vacant jobs point to the harsh truth that American employers are a leading cause of unemployment.

Hmmm. Where to begin? Database jockeys who don't know how to recruit or hire...a talent shortage of our own creation...the empty and unfulfilled promise of algorithms and keywords...flawed employment numbers from the feds.

 

 

 

 

 

Tags: Recruiters, Applicant Tracking Systems, Recruiting, Human Resources, Unemployment, Industry, Job hunt, Ask The Headhunter