Do you ever see a job posting that just makes you stop and read it all the way through, even though you aren't even remotely interested in the position - or the company? That happened to me recently and I thought I would share some of the reasons I think make it so great.

I am in a weekly peer networking group. We regularly forward links to articles and other things we think the group might be interested in, including the occasional career opportunity, even though most of us in the group are consultants.

Usually I will open the link, peruse the posting, and tuck it away in the back of my mind in the event I know someone who might be a fit. But this time I read it all the way through and thought about it in a whole different way.

When you look for yourself here, the first thing you will notice is that the link doesn't open to a job description with the typical bullet points for skills and qualifications, but instead opens to a landing page dedicated to this position.

I should mention this position isn't being filled by the company itself, but rather by EcommerceRecruiter.com, a contingency-based executive search firm. The job post is written as a blog post would be, with links to various things such as a V-card, LinkedIn groups, other jobs, archives, and of course a button to submit your resume for the position in question, a VP of Ecommerce. for a retailer.

The posting sets the stage by telling a little about the company, its history and its market niche.

Then there is a YouTube video that speaks to the culture, what this successful job candidate will be responsible for and then some very interesting copy. Following the typical boilerplate are personal notes put in by the person doing the search, Harry Joiner.

HARRY'S COMMENTS: It's always a good sign when, in order to be awarded a search, I must pass muster on a conference call with officers of the client’s company. It's an even better sign when the company’s CEO participates in that call. It tells me that the search is a high priority. Such was the case with this VP of Ecommerce search for Christopher and Banks.

It's always a good sign when, in order to be awarded a search, I must pass muster on a conference call with officers of the client’s company. It's an even better sign when the company’s CEO participates in that call.

Then Harry goes on to talk about recent financial performance, as well as some forecasts for the rest of the year. He adds some more insights into the goals and mandates of this new Ecommerce person, even drilling down to an internal debate about customer acquisition.

Then there are three full paragraphs about who this company's customer is, who the competition is, and then a section called questions great candidates ask, that includes some answers and insights.

  • What are a few things that drive results for the company?
  • What do you expect me to accomplish in the 1st 60 to 90 days?
  • What are the common attributes of your top performers?
  • Some other winning attributes

Then the page does end with the more traditional listing of responsibilities, qualifications and knowledge/skills.

When I finished reading, I felt as if I had a really strong sense of what the company wanted and needed, and what and who in would take to be successful. There was a clear picture emerging, and it was obvious the company and the search firm had spent some time working through this.

As we found out in this post I wrote about the uncoordinated interview process, that is not always the case.

“Neither candidates, nor companies, really know exactly what they want,

“Neither candidates, nor companies, really know exactly what they want,” said Bob Norton, a former business analyst turned information systems search and placement firm founder. “From the client side, it’s figuring out the business problem they have, not the laundry list of skills they think they need. On the candidate side, it’s taking an inventory of their skills and accomplishments, rather than merely looking at where they’ve been, then determining what the market is asking for.”

What do you think about Bob's statement, specifically in relation to the VP of Ecommerce posting?

Tags: News, Job Descriptions, Job postings, Executive search firm, Job Boards, Job Seekers, Qualifications, Skills