When the talent search engine TalentBin made its public launch last year, they were rather immodest in stating their value proposition, saying it "turned the entire professional web into the largest talent sourcing database known to mankind.” Is that what happened? Or is it just another aggregator of information widely available for recruiters - and others - online?

Everyone knows the best candidates aren't the most active job seekers, and where the recruiter creates value and earns their fee is by "reaching the unreachables," digging for those who aren't searching for a new role.

The best candidates aren't the most active job seekers, and where the recruiter creates value and earns their fee is by "reaching the unreachables," digging for those who aren't searching for a new role.

And certainly social media tools such as LinkedIn have made it possible to potentially do that quicker and on a larger scale than before.

But it stands to reason if you can use job boards and other widely available sources to find candidates, so can everyone else. Now what?

TalentBin works a little differently. Once you log on and create the title of whatever job you are recruiting on, it immediately searches every person with that background available anywhere on the web.

It combs social networking sites such as Facebook, Quora, Google+, Google Groups, MeetUp, Twitter, GitHub, Stack Overflow and makes it searchable by location and skills. Once your search results populate, you can search by your company’s network (with filters) or everyone (without filters).

And TalentBin added another first-of-its-kind source to its list, the US Patent Database. The new tool allows recruiters and hiring managers to find talent across five million patent grants and applications filed since 2005–that covers more than 100,000 companies and over one million individual credited inventors.

"Many of these highly skilled and specialized workers are not commonly found on LinkedIn or general online communities, making them relatively undiscoverable and unrecruitable…until now.”

By adding the US Patent Database to our talent search engine’s index, we’ve unlocked a treasure trove of incredible talent that recruiters would otherwise not be able to engage or find without Herculean effort,” said Peter Kazanjy, TalentBin’s co-founder. “Many of these highly skilled and specialized workers are not commonly found on LinkedIn or general online communities, making them relatively undiscoverable and unrecruitable…until now.”

This post in Fast Company saysLinkedIn makes the majority of its revenue by serving recruiters.

In the third quarter of 2012 for example, fully 55% of the company’s revenue came from what the company refers to as "Talent Solutions."

By contrast, premium subscription revenue from individual account holders only comprises about 20% of revenue.

Kazanjy says LinkedIn simply digests resumes into "this master database that recruiters pay a pretty penny to essentially get God rights to.”

Instead TalentBin has built a “search engine for people,” as Kazanjy puts it, one which he charges clients such as eBay, Facebook, and Groupon thousands per year for the privilege of accessing.

TalentBin has built a “search engine for people."

For a technology company, TalentBin has a very spare website. But on their home page they do incude the quote below from a corporate recruiter.

As a technology recruiter in a highly competitive market, TalentBin gives us a competitive advantage. My sourcing team quickly realized that TalentBin gives us results that other tools just can't -- helping us find many highly qualified candidates that weren't located with LinkedIn and Google searches. With TalentBin's search engine, it seems nobody is out of reach. We found it to be a massive timesaver and critical tool in our discovery of top talent. Jennifer Hasche -- Recruiter, Intuit

Kazanjy says it's less about the "aggregation" and more about the "interpretation," that "people leave signals on these varioius social sites, and the proper algorithmic interpretation of those signals is the secret sauce here.”

It's less about the "aggregation" and more about the "interpretation," that "people leave signals on these varioius social sites, and the proper algorithmic interpretation of those signals is the secret sauce here.”

A basic recruiting axiom is if you’re looking to recruit talented people, you go where those talented people hang out, right?  And today, that's online. So the TalentBin model seems to make sense.

Do any Staffing Talk readers have any experience using TalentBin? We would love to hear from you if you have.

For others, even if you haven't actually used it, we'd like to know if you have at least heard of TalentBin, and whether you would ever consider buying what they are selling.

Tags: Linkedin, News, LinkedIn Groups, Innovative job searches, Job search, Job Boards, Active Job Candidates, Passive Job Candidates, Passive Job Seekers, LinkedIn Employment, Candidate sourcing, TalentBin